Information about the March Against Monsanto in Detroit and related Food Justice/Sovereignity concerns.
Main website - mamdetroit.org
Reblogged from videre-licet  20 notes

The colonization of regenerative sources of the renewal of life is the ultimate ecological crisis: patriarchal science and technology, in the service of patriarchal capitalism, have torn apart cycles of regeneration, and forced them into linear flows of raw materials and commodities. The self-provisioning, self-regenerative systems have been reduced into ‘raw’ material, and consuming systems have been elevated into ‘production’ systems which supply commodities to consumers. The disruption of natural growth cycles becomes the source of capital growth because, as Marilyn Waring has pointed out, the principle of underlying collection of data for the national accounts is to exclude data relating to production where the producer is also the consumer. The destruction of regeneration is not revealed as destruction, instead the multiplication of ‘producers’ and ‘consumers’ and commodities signals growth

Mainstream environmentalists, as manifested in the 1992 Earth Summit, divorced from feminism, continue to use the model of the world designed by capitalist patriarchy. Instead of rebuilding ecological cycles, it focuses on technological fixes. Instead of relocating human activity in regeneration, it maintains the categories of production and consumption, and offers ‘green consumerism’ as an environmental panacea.

The feminist perspective is able to go beyond the categories of patriarchy that structure power and meaning in nature and society. It is broader and deeper because it locates production and consumption within the control of regeneration. Not only does this relate issues that have been so far treated as separate, such as linking production with reproduction, but more significantly by making these links, ecological feminism creates the possibility of viewing the world as an active subject, not merely as a resource to be manipulated and appropriated. It problematizes ‘production’ by exposing the destruction inherent in much of what capitalistic patriarchy has defined as productive and creates new spaces for the perception and experience of the creative act.

The ‘activation; of what has been, or is being constructed as ‘passive’ according to patriarchal perception, becomes then the most significant step in the renewal of life. Overcoming estrangement from nature’s rhythms and cycles of renewal and becoming a conscious participant in them becomes a major source of this activation. Women everywhere are indicating this. Whether it is Barbara McLintock talking of participating in nature’s perennial rhythms, or Itwari Devi describing how shakti (power) comes from forests and grasslands.

That search and experience of interdependence and integrity is the basis for creating a science and knowledge that nurtures, rather than violates, nature’s sustainable systems.

By Vandana Shiva, Ecofeminism (via eco—femme)

Reblogged from kingzach86  89 notes

fuzzytek:

With every swipe of an EBT for the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance program (SNAP) - JP Morgan/Chase, ACS/Xerox, Northrop Grumman, or   makes money as the contractor with the USDA. The 99% continues to feed the 1%. The food offered is the product of food processors and agricultural biotech companies such as Monsanto / Conagra to make sure we remain weakened, medically dependent on big pharmaceutical companies like Eli Lily, Pfizer, Merck, Bayer…

Occupy with the 99% and protest CONTROL by the 1%. 
Governments and Corporations should RESPECT The People.

I appreciate the satire brought through in this song by Chapter. It isn’t a celebration… realize your status as a tool of the system when you consign bringing life into this world in exchange for the welfare benefits received.

Welcome to the effects of a dumbed down world.
I want to change this in the world I live in.  Is it too late?

"I Like Money" from the film Idiocracy (2006)- the premise is given 500 years on our path of the dumbest percentage of people propagating faster than intelligent will. Watch it and be stupefied.

Reblogged from fuzzytek  14 notes

fuzzytek:

Michigan is causing deaths in Detroit

The imposed Emergency Manager has requested the city’s water department cut off water indiscriminately to 3000 households each week. No consideration of ability to pay, young children or elderly. This is what privatized water companies practice in their policies.

We also hear the EM wants to privatize the water. Note the ties to the State of Michigan proclaiming and doing everything it can to break a city that doesn’t fit it’s PURE MICHIGAN plans.

Numerous filings against the bankruptcy claim it was falsified by the state.

There is a big picture of human rights injustices. The mainstream will pick and chose how to frame the situations. Big picture is State of Michigan wants to remove Detroit undesirables, transform the city with Chinese venture capital assistance, and move the city farther into industrialization. Pollution in 48217 zip code is the worst in Michigan and surrounding areas can’t be much better.


From article at UN.org

“Disconnection of water services because of failure to pay due to lack of means constitutes a violation of the human right to water and other international human rights,” the experts stated in a news release.

The Detroit Water and Sewerage Department has been disconnecting water services from households which have not paid bills for two months, and has sped up the process since early June, with the number of disconnections rising to around 3,000 customers per week. As a result, some 30,000 households are expected to be disconnected from water services over the next few months.

The news release noted that due to high poverty and unemployment rates, relatively expensive water bills in Detroit are unaffordable for a significant portion of the population.

Detroit Water Warriors

http://peopleswaterboard.blogspot.com/2014/06/as-water-crisis-in-detroit-escalates.html

This is more than past due bills. It is spawned through the overturning of democracy in Detroit. The city’s elected officials get trumped by the State of Michigan’s imposed Emergency Manager.

The backlash is showing up in the suburbs as communities make moves to leave DWSD service. The State is breaking one of the most solid businesses ran by the city.

When you convince the people they are better off without control, then you control them. This is the new slavery of communities. Pushing economic failure in order for corporate rule to be secured. Privatizing the services needed for life secures the shackles of slavery. Detroit is on the verge of being corporate citizens without a voice, settled through contracts they don’t participate in negotiating.

Reblogged from sustainableprosperity  226 notes
sustainableprosperity:


Vandana Shiva on Resisting GMOs: ‘Saving Seeds is a Political Act’
By Sarah van Gelder

Trained in physics and philosophy, Vandana Shiva is renowned for her activism against GMOs, globalization, and patents on seeds and traditional foods. She co-founded Navdanya, which promotes seed saving and organic farming and has more than 70,000 farmer-members.
Sarah van Gelder: The seed has been a major part of your work. Could yousay a little about what a seed is at its essence?
Vandana Shiva: The seed in its essence is all of the past evolution of the Earth,the evolution of human history, and the potential for future evolution. Theseed is the embodiment of culture because culture shaped the seed with careful selection—women picked the best, diversified. So from one grass you get 200,000 rices.
 
 



That is a convergence of human intelligence and nature’s intelligence. It is the ultimate expression of life, and in our language, it means “that from which life arises on its own, forever and ever and ever.”
van Gelder: So what is it worth?
Shiva: It’s priceless. There is no price to seed, which is why the commodification of seed is such an outrage. Every culture that I’ve come across believes that destroying seed is the ultimate sin. Communities have starved to death rather than eat the seed grain.
van Gelder: The prevailing worldview separates humans from the natural world, and it has had terrible effects. How are people healing this separation, and how are seeds part of that work?
Shiva: No matter what problem you look at, every ecological problem comes from this illusion that we are separate from nature.
I believe overcoming the separation is a longing much deeper than therecent rise of ecological awareness. The healing is coming from reclaimingour oneness with the web of life, with the universe itself.
Some people do it through meditation and yoga, but a lot more are doingit by just planting a seed and growing a garden. In planting a seed you are onewith the cycles and regenerative capacity of life. We hear the same thing againand again from children we work with sowing gardens of hope with seeds offreedom. When you ask, “So what did you learn?” they always talk about themiracle of life—that a tiny seed bursts into a plant and gives an abundance,and they can harvest a seed from it.
A seed sown in the soil makes us one with the Earth. It makes us realize that we are the Earth. That this body of ours is the panchabhuta—the five elements that make the universe and make our bodies. The simple act of sowing a seed, saving a seed, planting a seed, harvesting a crop for a seed is bringing back this memory—this timeless memory of our oneness with the Earth and the creative universe.
There’s nothing that gives me deeper joy than the work of protecting the diversity and the freedom of the seed. Every expression of diversity is an expression of freedom, and every expression of monoculture is an expression of coercion.
van Gelder: Can you say more about that? What is the relationship of freedomto biodiversity?
Shiva: Life is self-organized. Self-organized systems evolve in diversity. Youare not identical to me, because each of us has evolved in freedom. The self-organizing capacity of life is expressed in diversity. Diversity of culture, diversity of humans, diversity of seeds.
Uniformity is constructed from the outside. It is coercive. So a farm of only Roundup Ready soya is actually a battlefield. Chemical warfare is goingon—spraying of Roundup to kill everything green, to kill the soil organisms,to kill the diversity, but also to kill the potential of the crop to manage itselfand diseases.
Monocultures can only be held together through external control, anduniformity and external control and concentration go hand in hand.
van Gelder: How do we, the people, get strong enough to counter the enormouspower of Monsanto and the like?
Shiva: We are dealing with life itself, so the first place we get power is byaligning ourselves with the forces of life. That is why the act of seed savingis such an important political act in this time. And that is the part that islinked to self-organizing—organizing yourself to save the seeds, have a community garden, create an exchange, do everything that it takes to protect and rejuvenate the seed. But at this point, industry is hungry to have absolutecontrol. They will not tolerate a single farmer who has freedom in his seedsupply. They will not stand a single seed that grows on its own terms.
van Gelder: If anything, things have gotten more dire since the last time wetalked. How do you get energized and keep your own spirits up?
Shiva: You know it is true that on the one hand, the concentration of power ismore than ever before. But I think the awareness about the illegitimacy of thispower is also more than ever before. If you take into account the number ofmovements, the number of protests taking place, and the number of people building alternatives, it’s huge.
The first place where I get joy as well as the energy to continue is the positivework of seed saving, promoting a peaceful agriculture, working with farmers, and now increasingly working with non-farmers. In the course we are running on the farm right now, we have 55 young people—someone from a banking system, someone from a software firm, three filmmakers.
No matter where in the world you are, people are realizing food is important. They are realizing food begins with seed, and everyone wants to learn. When I see those processes get unleashed, when I see how rapidly gardening has become such an important way of healing violence—I just met a young man who’s working with ex-convicts to spread gardens. That’s his work! He’s created a firm, and they are the owners, and the board members—how can you not be charged with energy?
Sarah van Gelder interviewed Vandana Shiva for How To Eat Like Our Lives Depend On It, the Winter 2014 issue of YES! Magazine. Sarah is executive editor of YES!
This article was published at NationofChange at: http://www.nationofchange.org/vandana-shiva-resisting-gmos-saving-seeds-political-act-1384786994. All rights are reserved.

sustainableprosperity:

image

Vandana Shiva on Resisting GMOs: ‘Saving Seeds is a Political Act’

By Sarah van Gelder

Trained in physics and philosophy, Vandana Shiva is renowned for her activism against GMOs, globalization, and patents on seeds and traditional foods. She co-founded Navdanya, which promotes seed saving and organic farming and has more than 70,000 farmer-members.


Sarah van Gelder: The seed has been a major part of your work. Could you
say a little about what a seed is at its essence?

Vandana Shiva: The seed in its essence is all of the past evolution of the Earth,
the evolution of human history, and the potential for future evolution. The
seed is the embodiment of culture because culture shaped the seed with careful selection—women picked the best, diversified. So from one grass you get 200,000 rices.

 
 

That is a convergence of human intelligence and nature’s intelligence. It is the ultimate expression of life, and in our language, it means “that from which life arises on its own, forever and ever and ever.”

van Gelder: So what is it worth?

Shiva: It’s priceless. There is no price to seed, which is why the commodification of seed is such an outrage. Every culture that I’ve come across believes that destroying seed is the ultimate sin. Communities have starved to death rather than eat the seed grain.

van Gelder: The prevailing worldview separates humans from the natural world, and it has had terrible effects. How are people healing this separation, and how are seeds part of that work?

Shiva: No matter what problem you look at, every ecological problem comes from this illusion that we are separate from nature.

I believe overcoming the separation is a longing much deeper than the
recent rise of ecological awareness. The healing is coming from reclaiming
our oneness with the web of life, with the universe itself.

Some people do it through meditation and yoga, but a lot more are doing
it by just planting a seed and growing a garden. In planting a seed you are one
with the cycles and regenerative capacity of life. We hear the same thing again
and again from children we work with sowing gardens of hope with seeds of
freedom. When you ask, “So what did you learn?” they always talk about the
miracle of life—that a tiny seed bursts into a plant and gives an abundance,
and they can harvest a seed from it.

A seed sown in the soil makes us one with the Earth. It makes us realize that we are the Earth. That this body of ours is the panchabhuta—the five elements that make the universe and make our bodies. The simple act of sowing a seed, saving a seed, planting a seed, harvesting a crop for a seed is bringing back this memory—this timeless memory of our oneness with the Earth and the creative universe.

There’s nothing that gives me deeper joy than the work of protecting the diversity and the freedom of the seed. Every expression of diversity is an expression of freedom, and every expression of monoculture is an expression of coercion.

van Gelder: Can you say more about that? What is the relationship of freedom
to biodiversity?

Shiva: Life is self-organized. Self-organized systems evolve in diversity. You
are not identical to me, because each of us has evolved in freedom. The self-organizing capacity of life is expressed in diversity. Diversity of culture, diversity of humans, diversity of seeds.

Uniformity is constructed from the outside. It is coercive. So a farm of only Roundup Ready soya is actually a battlefield. Chemical warfare is going
on—spraying of Roundup to kill everything green, to kill the soil organisms,
to kill the diversity, but also to kill the potential of the crop to manage itself
and diseases.

Monocultures can only be held together through external control, and
uniformity and external control and concentration go hand in hand.

van Gelder: How do we, the people, get strong enough to counter the enormous
power of Monsanto and the like?

Shiva: We are dealing with life itself, so the first place we get power is by
aligning ourselves with the forces of life. That is why the act of seed saving
is such an important political act in this time. And that is the part that is
linked to self-organizing—organizing yourself to save the seeds, have a community garden, create an exchange, do everything that it takes to protect and rejuvenate the seed. But at this point, industry is hungry to have absolute
control. They will not tolerate a single farmer who has freedom in his seed
supply. They will not stand a single seed that grows on its own terms.

van Gelder: If anything, things have gotten more dire since the last time we
talked. How do you get energized and keep your own spirits up?

Shiva: You know it is true that on the one hand, the concentration of power is
more than ever before. But I think the awareness about the illegitimacy of this
power is also more than ever before. If you take into account the number of
movements, the number of protests taking place, and the number of people building alternatives, it’s huge.

The first place where I get joy as well as the energy to continue is the positive
work of seed saving, promoting a peaceful agriculture, working with farmers, and now increasingly working with non-farmers. In the course we are running on the farm right now, we have 55 young people—someone from a banking system, someone from a software firm, three filmmakers.

No matter where in the world you are, people are realizing food is important. They are realizing food begins with seed, and everyone wants to learn. When I see those processes get unleashed, when I see how rapidly gardening has become such an important way of healing violence—I just met a young man who’s working with ex-convicts to spread gardens. That’s his work! He’s created a firm, and they are the owners, and the board members—how can you not be charged with energy?

Sarah van Gelder interviewed Vandana Shiva for How To Eat Like Our Lives Depend On It, the Winter 2014 issue of YES! Magazine. Sarah is executive editor of YES!

This article was published at NationofChange at: http://www.nationofchange.org/vandana-shiva-resisting-gmos-saving-seeds-political-act-1384786994. All rights are reserved.

Reblogged from thepeoplesrecord  5,346 notes

thepeoplesrecord:

Today we honor Vandana Shiva, because as the corporate oligarchy continues to destroy our planet, it is clear that we need more leadership like hers:

All of these available on our Facebook page: (links: Tumblr | Facebook | Twitter)